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Posts Tagged ‘Justice’

Life no longer so gay at Ireland’s seminary Maynooth

August 3rd, 2016 Comments off

DO you have that Trumped-out feeling? One can only be outraged, sickened, appalled, and yet entertained, for so long, right? And Trumpetisation has been ongoing for over a year. The topic of DJT has now been banned from my family dinner table. We are just putting our fingers in our ears, casting down our eyes, and hoping that we will wake up on November 9 and it will all have been a nasty dream, and a responsible human being is in the White House.

And just when there’s a need for something new to be exercised about, the Catholic Church obliges.

It’s the decision by Archbishop of Dublin and Good Egg, Diarmuid Martin, to stop sending his trainee priests to St Patrick’s College at Maynooth. Maynooth has for over 200 years been a “pontifical university” (offering courses in theology and related disciplines) and a training college for novice priests. The Archbishop referred to homosexual activity and “strange goings-on” – a rather twee and non-specific term, from such an intelligent man. The media, certain sections of it revelling in this story, have run reports that the gay dating app Grindr was being put through its paces at Maynooth.

Well: maybe you are shocked. But surely not at the idea of gay activity among priests? Perhaps the past two decades have blunted our sensibilities with regard to the sexual activity of the clergy. There have been so many shocking and disgraceful cases of sexual abuse, particularly of children in the care of the Church. But consenting sex among adult males? Is the Church still pretending that homosexuality doesn’t exist, or doesn’t exist among its staff? Read more…

Women are disposable – still

April 10th, 2015 Comments off

IF you haven’t read recently about an Irish architect called Graham Dwyer, count yourself lucky. If you haven’t, you’re also probably living in another country, as the Dwyer trial was big news in Ireland for the first three months of 2015.

And if you haven’t perhaps you should – not only because it is a fascinating if repulsive story, but also because it, sadly, suggests at the underlying attitude to women in the human race.

And that is: disposable.

Read more…

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Rebekah – the speculation continues…

June 25th, 2014 Comments off

Sorry, more about Rebekah B…

When I left News International at Wapping in 1991, a young woman 11 years my junior was just starting her career there. Maybe we passed on the stairs? She most certainly would have been the one going up!

Rebekah Wade, as she was then, the “flame-haired temptress” in the joke cliché beloved of British satirists, was not a journalist but a secretary. In the law, medicine, other professions, an unqualified person cannot take on the role of the practitioner. But journalism is one of the few fields where a person can literally work their way up from sweeping the floor or running errands – it happened a lot in the 20th century and is still possible today. It’s a good thing, but does undermine the claims many of us, including me, would like to make for journalism being regarded as a profession.

But Rebekah Wade/Kemp/Brooks’s talents cannot be classified in a traditional way – other than that of the courtesan, the wildly successful female enchantress of men of power.

For the unusual thing about Brooks, it appears, is that she has succeeded with charm and grit, and seduced [not, of course, in the physical sense] all those around her from mogul Rupert Murdoch to former PM’s wife Sarah Brown. Read more…

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Youth unemployment ‘could destroy the EU’

September 28th, 2013 Comments off

The world of work can be a pretty rotten place. That’s even setting aside the boring tasks, colleagues with bad breath, and unpleasable bosses. But at least it’s work. Work is turning to a monster for many people because of the conditions imposed on them to hang on to that job, and a wage that continues to shrink – if you get a wage at all. Unpaid internships have ballooned out of control, and here in Ireland unscrupulous employers have been quick to jump on the government’s ‘JobBridge’ bandwagon to grab staff for nothing. (In JobBridge, the person employed is paid only €50 a week on top of their social welfare transfer. See also Scambridge, a website which tries to expose the failings of the scheme.) These morose ruminations came as a result of a seminar on employment and a living wage, organised by Irish Minister for Social Protection, Joan Burton, and colleagues in the Labour Party.

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After Lean In, The World Needs ‘Clean In’

May 27th, 2013 Comments off

There’s been a lot of buzz generated by Lean In, the snappy book from Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook’s COO (and if you don’t know what COO stands for, the book is perhaps not for you).

It means “chief operating officer”, which makes Sandberg a Very Important Person indeed in modern corporate America. And the world, given Facebook’s claimed billion users, with around 650 million of those active daily.

The title refers to a Sandberg exhortation to women in business to “lean in” when they’re at meetings, rather than hanging back, not speaking, lurking in the corners of the room. It’s a manifesto for career women to stop accepting second place, Seize the Day, and the balls of the alpha males. And it’s good.

Setting aside the relentless energy and obsession with work – which Sandberg acknowledges – the book has a lot of universal truths about the respective roles of men and women in society, whether dressed up as equality in western countries, or blatantly unequal in other regions. When it talks about women downgrading their skills (often internally), not going for the big job, dropping out of a promising job because they can’t juggle children and career, it makes a lot of points easily recognizable by any woman who’s worked outside the home in the last 30 years.

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